Not a Trailer but a Boat Lift Question

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Not a Trailer but a Boat Lift Question

Postby peteburrs » Wed Feb 08, 2012 1:56 pm

I am wondering if someone can give me some advice on my boat lift for my 1959 Holiday 250. I purchased a boat lift last month (thought it would give me some incentive to finish my boat this summer) and I am wondering if I need to add some structure to the center of the lift to support the keel. I plan to redo the bunks in the back so that they will extend past the transom to support the weight of the transom and motor.

Thanks in advance for any recommendations!
Pete Burrs
Lake Dubay, WI
1959 Cruiser Holiday 250
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Postby Phill Blank » Wed Feb 08, 2012 8:13 pm

Pete,

I would recommend full length bunk if the lift does not already have them. If these are place under the sister keelsons you should not need keel support. You may want to have some guide rails or rollers on the sides to make sure the boat is always located so the bunks are under the sister keelsons.

Anybody else have a comment?

Good Luck,

Phill
Image
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Postby Torchie » Thu Feb 09, 2012 10:18 am

I agree with Phil.
Most of these lifts are setup for fiberglass boats. You are going to need some sort of hull support other than a cradle in the front and some rollers at the transom.
Phil's thoughts in regards to the to the supports under the sister keelsons works for me. Since the boat will be floating over the the lift cradle you should be able to line it up with the help of some side guides.
May be as simple as the use of some treated beams running fore and aft and then some adjustable bunk brackets or blocking under a 1x6 carpeted plank.
Post some pics when you get it done.
Karl.
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Postby peteburrs » Thu Feb 09, 2012 10:58 am

Great suggestions guys! Thanks for the reply and once I get it reconfigured I will be sure to share some pictures.
Pete Burrs
Lake Dubay, WI
1959 Cruiser Holiday 250
peteburrs
 
Posts: 36
Joined: Wed Jun 15, 2011 8:06 am
Location: Mosinee, WI

Postby TheCaptain » Fri Feb 10, 2012 10:01 am

I'm under the impression that treated wood shouldn't be used for bunks. That's what the boat trailer people told me when I had mine done. I'm not sure what they ended up using though. Boat lift sounds nice. Well, water front property sounds nice too I guess. Good luck!
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Postby LancerBoy » Fri Feb 10, 2012 10:09 am

why would anyone use untreated wood for a boat lift bunk or bunks on a boat trailer? it would decay and have to be replaced in just a few short years.

Andreas
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Postby TheCaptain » Fri Feb 10, 2012 11:31 am

I think it was something about it being bad for the lake. Maybe it's certain type of treated wood they were talking about. It was a while ago so not sure.

I know you're the wood expert so I'm sure you know best

Later on!
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Postby LancerBoy » Fri Feb 10, 2012 2:23 pm

bad for the lake? what about all the zillions of piers, docks, retaining walls, boardwalks, bridge structures, etc.....?????

Waterborne pressure preservative treatments are soluable in water and insoluable once fixed into the cellular structure of the wood thru the treating process. The treatment does not leach out. Some of the "new generation" treatments that are sold as "arsenic free" and "friendly", leach like nothing before. In fact, the Minnesota Department of Transportation banned the use of ACQ treatment in any DOT project (noise walls, bridges, sign posts, utility posts, abutments....) becasue the stuff leaches so much.

Oil borne treatments such as creosote and pentachlorophenol leach, however, one would never use this type of treatment for boat trailer and lift bunks.

Andreas
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Postby Torchie » Fri Feb 10, 2012 3:05 pm

Andreas is right in regards to the treated lumber issue. Old stuff used to contain nasties including arsenic. I knew a construction guy who almost lost an eye when he got a particle of sawdust from the old stuff in it. Wasn't the particle that was the problem but the nasties that it contained.
So if you want to go "green" find some cedar to use or white oak instead of treated . Should last you a while since the only time the wood will be in the water is when the lift is down and the boat is off it.
Karl.
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