How do you heat your shed?

Questions/concerns/issues. How did the other guy do it? Find out here.

Moderators: TDockside, Miles, a j r, Moderators

How do you heat your shed?

Postby vernonfarmer » Fri Oct 07, 2011 6:42 pm

Winter is coming to the north country. Wondering how many different ways a person can heat a 16' x 24' uninsulated shed? Don't have to have it heated 24/7...just while working or curing paint or varnish. Leaning toward a small pellet stove. I have electric but no gas at the site.
vernonfarmer
 
Posts: 106
Joined: Wed Jul 19, 2006 6:59 pm
Location: Vernon, WI

Postby LancerBoy » Sat Oct 08, 2011 7:32 am

16 x 24 ft. is not that big of an area to heat. However, not having insulation will make it more difficult. I had a small wood stove in my garage shop (about 24 x 26 ft with 10 ft ceiling) which was well insulated. Kept it pretty warm. I also had a small ceiling hung electric space heater to help out.

Remember that when using finishes you must have the temperature of the surfaces at the required temperature, not just the air around the item. You will have to maintain the required temperature prior to applying the finish and long afterwards so that it cures properly.

Andreas
LancerBoy
 
Posts: 1417
Joined: Mon Jan 28, 2008 3:47 am
Location: Minneapolis

Postby vernonfarmer » Sat Oct 08, 2011 6:54 pm

That's why I like the idea of the pellet stove, Andreas. I can load it with up to 40lb. of pellets and it will burn for almost 24 hrs. Loading a hopper with pellets is considerably less work than cutting, hauling, splitting and stacking wood.
vernonfarmer
 
Posts: 106
Joined: Wed Jul 19, 2006 6:59 pm
Location: Vernon, WI

Postby Phill Blank » Sun Oct 09, 2011 2:03 pm

vernonfarmer,

My present work area is approximately 20 x 20 x 8'0". I insulated the ceiling and about 3/4 of the walls, one small area needs to be done yet, with 4" insulation. I used a ceiling hung propane heater with thermostat and fan which works well. I keep the heat low when not in the shop working on project so glues and paints do not freeze. I use two 100 pound tanks for the heater and go threw about 6 tanks a winter with moderate usage. Big projects can use up more if it is really cold.

I did have a wood burner, but the insurance compnay would not insure the building so I had to switch to the propane heater.

Not sure what I will do when I build my bigger shop up north when I move. I was thinking about installing pex tubing in the slab and use hot water with anti-freeze. That way I can zone area with more heat and less in area of storage. Would like to have a outside wood burner water heater with a propane backup unit inside for the times when I would be gone for a long period of time.

I would highly recommend insulation as it will save you lots of dollars in what ever fuel you use. The more insulation the better. Foam is the best inch for inch. Spray foam also give you sealing, vapor barrier and good high R value for the dollars spent.

Good Luck,

Phill
Image
Phill Blank
 
Posts: 412
Joined: Thu Jan 05, 2006 4:20 pm
Location: Hurley, Wisconsin

Postby vernonfarmer » Sun Oct 09, 2011 4:07 pm

Thanks, Phil, sounds like a good set up. Thought about the 100lb. propane tank but access to the building is not easy in the winter. Not sure I can wrestle one or more of those babies through a foot or more of snow. I know I need to insulate. That's whole 'nother project for sure. What do you, or anyone else reading know about these infrared heaters? Got a flyer in today's paper from Tractor Supply touting a unit that heats up to 1000 sq. ft. for "pennies a day".
vernonfarmer
 
Posts: 106
Joined: Wed Jul 19, 2006 6:59 pm
Location: Vernon, WI

Postby LancerBoy » Mon Oct 10, 2011 3:40 am

The infared heating units are the worst ones possible for wooden boats. They dry 'em out fast - like being baked in the desert heat.

This is what I was considering for my shop, but was steered away from infared by Don Danenbrg.

Andreas
LancerBoy
 
Posts: 1417
Joined: Mon Jan 28, 2008 3:47 am
Location: Minneapolis

Postby 59Thompson » Mon Oct 10, 2011 5:56 am

Good morning. Be very careful in your selection. Make sure you install a smoke detector and a carbon monoxide detector. For my .02, job two is the insulation, they have self spray foam units at some lumber stores now, fiberglass bat is very fast and easy to do if you work alone. Drywall will give you fire resistance and white paint a lot of light. I made a cheap wall shelf storage system using Z brackets and file boxes.

Your insurance company may require you to drywall it if it is attached to the house. I have used a DESA wall mount unvented natural gas unit with built in automatic thermostat for some years, they make a propane unit as well. No electricity is needed, it was under $200 when I bought it and it actually generates some humidity for the space i.e no rapid drying issues like infrared as Andreas pointed out so okay for storage. The two car garage was insulated and drywalled when we bought the house so piping the gas over was a natural. I would be very cautious of applying finishes because of the open flame and the smoke detector will likely activate if you are spraying. A flame, without an external air source burns the vapor of anything sprayed in there, i.e. bad smell toxic fumes so I would not recommend it for other than mechanical work and to keep a door or window slightly cracked when in there to provide some makeup air. The units have an oxygen depletion sensor and the pilot and flame will also go out should the thermocouple lose heat. We have a similar unit in the living room decorative gas fireplace we use for emergencies and early in the season or in the spring when we don't need to run the hot water radiator system. The satisfaction when you have it done will be immense, the ability to go out in a warm space in your camping shorts and change oil, plane some wood,enjoy a cigar, etc when its cold and gray and your sick of snow makes it all worthwhile. Be safe and regards, John
59Thompson
 
Posts: 18
Joined: Tue Aug 18, 2009 12:56 pm
Location: NW Ohio

Postby Phill Blank » Mon Oct 10, 2011 6:15 am

vernonfarmer,

I have my supplier deliver and exchange the 100 pound tanks when needed. I just keep the area clear of snow as the tanks are right next to the driveway leading to the shop and single stall garage building.
You can also get larger tank, smaller then what they call "pigs", depending on your useage. These can be filled once a year. My usage was not enough to justify my supplier setting me up with one of these.

Also the gas ceiling heater I have is a totally sealed with intake and exhaust all out side the building. No problems with CO or with fumes when painting or varnishing getting into combustion chamber.

Good luck,

Phill
Image
Phill Blank
 
Posts: 412
Joined: Thu Jan 05, 2006 4:20 pm
Location: Hurley, Wisconsin

Postby sayuncle » Mon Oct 10, 2011 1:12 pm

When I built my shop (24X30), I insulated 6" fiberglass in the walls and 16" of blown in insulation in the ceiling. I installed a propane Reznor heater and a 120 gallon tank. One fill will last the season so I don't have to worry about winter filling. Install a programmable thermostat and forget about it. Maintain 50F at all times and turn up when I am working on projects. This setup will last a long time. Hopefully my boat will be finished first!!! Several of my friends have pellet stoves and really like them though. Good luck with your decision!

Brad
Brad K
sayuncle
 
Posts: 31
Joined: Mon Sep 06, 2010 6:26 pm
Location: Abrams, WI

Postby vernonfarmer » Mon Oct 10, 2011 3:21 pm

Good feedback, guys. We know infrared is out. Still like the pellet stove idea since it does have fresh air feed and is a sealed unit. If it helps with more suggestions, here are photos of the shack I need to heat. Overhead door is the only access. No service door. But sure would like to add one. I'd also like, some day, to add on to the left side of the building. Heat source should be able to handle up to 1,200 sq. ft. eventually.
Thanks again for the ideas.

John
Image
Image
Image
vernonfarmer
 
Posts: 106
Joined: Wed Jul 19, 2006 6:59 pm
Location: Vernon, WI

Postby thegammas » Tue Oct 11, 2011 8:33 am

I want me one of those 'shacks'!

I have an attached two car garage that I want to heat as well, but the effort to insulate has kept me at bay (currently uninsulated and drywalled with a crappy overhead door.

My house is on a slope, so I have an exterior entrance into my full unfinished basement. Was thinking of cutting the 32 inch standard door opening out to a doulble 36' door (tots 72"). Even in the coldest Delaware winters it never gets near 50 degrees down there and it is so nice and cool in the summers. The wide opening i could get my beetle and the boat in there for work. I'd have to measure to be sure of course.

So the cost would be cuttting opening out, the doors, and of course the careptry to put in a new sill plate over the doors (which i could do)
Peter Stransky
1962 Cortland Custom Sea Lancer
Wilmington, Delaware
thegammas
 
Posts: 563
Joined: Sat Nov 25, 2006 2:10 pm
Location: Wilmington, Delaware. peterstransky@verizon.net - put wooden boat in the subject

Postby W Guy » Wed Oct 12, 2011 1:23 pm

I have a detached brick shop and I installed one of these. They can be found in a Grainger catalog (or web site). It's gas and has an electric igniter rather than a pilot flame. If I'm using paint or chemicals, I can turn it off temporarily until the vapors clear. I'm not a big fan of forced hot air because I can't stand it blowing on my face, but this one blows out at the floor (where it's needed).
I like it because it doesn't take up much room except for a narrow slice of the wall.


Verne :DImage
W Guy
 
Posts: 199
Joined: Mon Oct 13, 2008 10:30 am

Postby thegammas » Wed Oct 12, 2011 6:31 pm

I looked for this heater at the stie and no could find....do you remember the brand or anything?
Peter Stransky
1962 Cortland Custom Sea Lancer
Wilmington, Delaware
thegammas
 
Posts: 563
Joined: Sat Nov 25, 2006 2:10 pm
Location: Wilmington, Delaware. peterstransky@verizon.net - put wooden boat in the subject

Postby W Guy » Thu Oct 13, 2011 3:15 am

I'll look up the literature tonight Pete. :D
W Guy
 
Posts: 199
Joined: Mon Oct 13, 2008 10:30 am

Postby LancerBoy » Thu Oct 13, 2011 4:05 am

I have contracted for construction of my 34' x 70' shed. Cutting and breaking up old concrete this weekend. Should be late November for installation of the building. About 30' to 32' of the length will eventually be my shop - insulated, wired, and heated. I am not sure how I will heat. I have a small wood stove which I know will not be enuff. The pellet stove sounds appealing. Supplemental forced air gas will probably be the eventual choice.

Andreas
LancerBoy
 
Posts: 1417
Joined: Mon Jan 28, 2008 3:47 am
Location: Minneapolis

Next

Return to Restoration

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests

cron