Rotted and Partially Missing Ribs

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Rotted and Partially Missing Ribs

Postby Barry » Thu Oct 20, 2011 11:45 am

I have removed the floor from my 63 Sea Coaster and found some rot in one side of the T keel piece and I will need to replace that. I also discovered some ribs that are rotted where they meet the keel and someone has previously removed some parts of other ribs as well.

Can someone advise how to repair the rotted and partially missing ribs and also provide any advice you can on replacing the keel piece? Some pics are below to show the situation.

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Barry
 
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Postby Torchie » Thu Oct 20, 2011 8:41 pm

Best starting place would be to scroll thru the older posts in the restoration section of this site. Many of your questions will be answered there.
Look for subject tiltes such as "rib removal and repair". Or "Steam bending ribs" or "Keelson repair"
You can also purchase books in regards to wooden boat restoration. The Dannenberg(sp) books seem to be a good source for many people.
There is an older post titled "Boat Nomenclature(" I think) that Andreas posted showing all the parts to the boat and their correct terms. Print it out and use it. You will find it easier to get correct answers if we all know what you are talking about :lol:
These boats were assembled in a straight forward 1,2,3 etc. step manner so dissasembling is usually a 3,2,1 step process. If that make sense. And most of us just use basic hand and or power tools to do the work.
Lots of great folks here to help.
Good Luck.
Karl.
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Postby LancerBoy » Fri Oct 21, 2011 4:01 am

Get rid of that caulk or putty or whatever the gooooop at the keelson - planking junction. That is probably a contributing factor for the rot.

Whomever did this impeeded the water from being able to flow front to back. The limber holes got plugged up. Bad. Very bad.

I bet the entire "T" keelson has major rot in it.

Back out screws to dis-assemble parts. There will most likely also be nails which you can pull out or just cut off.

Andreas
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Postby Barry » Fri Oct 21, 2011 5:34 am

Thanks for the advice guys. I'll do the necessary research here and then get my hands dirty. This might sound strange to some people but - this is fun!
Barry
 
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Postby brian62 » Mon Oct 24, 2011 5:40 pm

I would definetly suggest you replace the bad wood wherever and whatever it is. I tried short cuts by cutting out just the rot and piecing in new wood and i tried using epoxy to fix broken ribs.Neither of these quick fixes worked.When i stepped on the ribs that i epoxied they cracked as i found out later epoxy doesnt take very well to oak.The piecing in of wood required epoxy and it was ok for the mahogany wood but again not for the oak.So i had to do a lot of work over again.Some places you can piece in wood but other places should be avoided.I would also suggest saving any pieces of old wood and use as patterns.I would also look ahead at the job at hand and think a few steps ahead.I made wrong angle cuts and various other mistakes by trying to rush this project.I have gone back and corrected those mistakes and feel much better about it all, and like you said it is a lot of fun and the folks on this web site have been very helpful.If your not 100% sure about something i would ask these guys.Good luck and enjoy! Brian 62
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Postby Barry » Tue Oct 25, 2011 5:59 am

brian62 wrote:I would definetly suggest you replace the bad wood wherever and whatever it is. I tried short cuts by cutting out just the rot and piecing in new wood and i tried using epoxy to fix broken ribs.Neither of these quick fixes worked.When i stepped on the ribs that i epoxied they cracked as i found out later epoxy doesnt take very well to oak.The piecing in of wood required epoxy and it was ok for the mahogany wood but again not for the oak.So i had to do a lot of work over again.Some places you can piece in wood but other places should be avoided.I would also suggest saving any pieces of old wood and use as patterns.I would also look ahead at the job at hand and think a few steps ahead.I made wrong angle cuts and various other mistakes by trying to rush this project.I have gone back and corrected those mistakes and feel much better about it all, and like you said it is a lot of fun and the folks on this web site have been very helpful.If your not 100% sure about something i would ask these guys.Good luck and enjoy! Brian 62


I have been thinking exactly the same thing. I do not want to do a patch job and regret it later. While everything is accessible it makes sense to do first class work and replace the damaged parts completely. I think what we will do is put together a "story board" plan of sorts so that we do things in a logical order. Thanks for your comments and ideas.
Barry
 
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