Offshore Purchase, Its real this time!!

Questions/concerns/issues. How did the other guy do it? Find out here.

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Offshore Purchase, Its real this time!!

Postby PeterZ » Fri Dec 09, 2011 6:15 am

Hello Everyone

Well I finally did it. After many years of searching, and after asking many many questions on this forum, and then mentioning I was boatless (to which you guys were probably wondering why is this jerk asking all the questions), I finally bought a boat!!!

I am pretty sure its a Peshtigo built 1965 Thompson Off Shore, 20'-1" center length. In a previous post I learned a bit about the number stamped in the transom, however I have not found the metal plate to verify the model and location built. The previous owner started to disassemble the transom so I am not sure where the plate might be.

Here is a picture, I hope that it comes out. I will send more if this works.

Image

The story is somebody trailered the boat from Michigan to the Rochester NY area, where is was sold again, then I bought it, so of course no registration on the boat or trailer. :?

It seems to be in very good shape in terms of rotted wood. However I plan to flip it and do a full re-fasten and replace things as needed.

First restoration question. I need to build a new transom and the old one has been partially disassembled. I am not sure all the pieces are there, but the inside pieces that screw to the strakes are still in tack to give me a pattern. If I build the 'outboard' side of the transom with horizontal pieces of Mahogany, are there pieces of mahogney laminated vertically on the inside across the entire transom? Or just the outer perimeter of the transom and where the motor goes, sort of like the picture from a very recent 'Transom Construction' post. If anyone has a picture of the inside of their transom from a boat of this vintage, that would be appreciated.

I am considering putting a newer power source on it like a 4-stroke. Really heavy, is there a benefit to making a transom 3 layers thick (I am not sure how thick each layer of the transom is (3/4" or 1", havn't measured yet). Then adding metal supports to the transom with through bolts through the transom. I am not sure how the original knees would have been attached since they have been taken off already and I have not found them yet (they are probably laying inside the boat someplace). Didn't know if the knees were screwed from the inside of the boat, through the knee and into the transom. This would seem to make better structural sense as oppose to going from the transom into the end grain of the knee (assuming end grain touches the transom)

I have other questions on which order to insert the new transom, fix ribs, garboard planks, re-fasten, when to bed with calk/adhesive, but I will wait for another post.

thanks!!

I am very excited to start working on her and get her in the water!! Its my first wood boat and my first boat of this size.

Regards
Peter
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Postby PeterZ » Fri Dec 09, 2011 6:23 am

[img]imageshack.us/photo/my-images/401/p1010857u.jpg/[/img]

ok, another image post try, what am I doing wrong. One FAQ said I could use imageshack, ... I tried with the http and with out it??
hmmm
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Postby Big Ray » Fri Dec 09, 2011 6:43 am

I'm not sure how your transom originally looked, but the transom on my Grady White had horizontal Mahogany planking on the outside and vertical Mahogany planks on the inside with one horizontal plank at the bottom. The interior planks had chamfers on the edges of the boards. When I replaced the transom, I duplicated the original pattern, but was concerned with strength so I laminated the exterior and interior planks to 1/2" marine plywood for a total transom thickness of 2". When I installed the new transom, I added aditional Knee Braces between the transom and the sister keelsons. It's not original, but with this boat I'm more concerned with strength.
Just my two cents worth.
Good Luck!
Ray
1962 Lyman, 16' O/B
1964 Grady White, 16.5' O/B
1967 Lyman, 16' I/O
1956 Chris Craft, 17' Sportsman
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Postby LancerBoy » Fri Dec 09, 2011 9:15 am

Welcome to the insanity!

It's a Peshtigo built boat by Thompson Bros. Boat Mfg. Co. It is NOT a boat made by Thompson Boat Company of New York, Inc. at Cortland.

The deck details and seats tell me she is 1964 or newer.

The transom will be two layers of wood: interior layer are vertical boards and exterior layer are horizontal boards. They are screwed together from the inside. Using a thin marine plywood core between these two layers, glued and screwed, is a good idea.

I restored a 1965 Peshtigo Sea Lancer a few years ago. I might have some photos of the transom. I think I had to replace one of the exterior and some of the interior boards. there may be some pictures on my facebook page.

Knees are screwed to transom and to stringers from the inside. I don't think they used knees on 1965 models, however. I know I added some to a 1959 Peshtigo Sea Lancer I restored a while ago.

Andreas
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Postby TheCaptain » Fri Dec 09, 2011 10:23 am

Looks very very similar to my Peshtigo Built '64 Super Lancer. Cargo bins and steering wheel look identical. Congrats!
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Postby PeterZ » Fri Dec 09, 2011 1:46 pm

All

thanks for the info. I spent a little time today cleaning her out a bit more. the previous owner kept all the parts he took off (wood and hardware) and put them in the boat. I DID find the transom piece with the serical number on it. Andreas I will post that question under 'What do I have here'.

So now I pieced the inside board together (the verticle pieces) and see the shape. As I said, some of the boards on the peremiter of the transome, both inside and outside, are still screwed to the boat, while the previous owner pulled most of the inside boards off an the middle and bottom horizontal boards off the outside (apparently there were only three boards. There seems to be no evidence of any plywood as you all suggest.

If I do put a middle layer of plywood in, did you guys cover the perimeter of it with solid wood so the plys were not visable or exposed to weather (at least the top edge that you can see). Isn't there an issue with laminating boards to a piece of plywood, ... I would think the Mahogney boardy would want to move width wise while the plywood is stable.

An approach I was thinking was, glue up the outside boards as a big blank (should I use eposy or some marine glue for the edge glue here? what do you suggest), after that dries, epoxy it to a piece of plywood as you suggest, after that dries, start epoxying the verticle boards in to the plywood (and screwed through to the other piece of plywood) and epoxying the edges together. Then cut to fit.

What is the typical motor shaft length and what is the distance from the top of the transom where the motor will sit, to the bottom edge of the transom.

I have a general question on the order of repair now that I had time to look a few things over with more stuff out of the boat like the floor and seats. OOOfffffffff, I have lots of ribs to fix. I will start another post.

Thanks for any comments on the transom

Regards
Peter
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Thompson Offshores

Postby Tim the Toolman » Mon Jan 23, 2012 12:06 pm

Hi Peter, my name is Tim and own a 1968 Thompson Offshore Camper (model 2060). I've just started to restore the boat here in the Seattle area. She leaks like a sieve so I knew the planking would need to be resealed. The transom needs to be replaced too from having a 125 hp outboard hanging off the back after years of storage. I removed the engine and windshield and flipped it over Christmas. Having trouble stripping the paint due to cold weather and an only slightly warmer shop. I plan on removing the planking in sections and resealing leaving out the fasteners at the transom. Once the planking is back on and holding the boat shape I'll remove and replace the transom. The decks aren't in the greatest shape, so after I flip the boat back over I'll probably replace them too, then I might make a new windshield from the old one and include windows that open, they don't now. Lots to do. I'll be interested in your restoration.
Tim
Tim the Toolman
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Postby txcaptdan » Tue Jan 24, 2012 8:10 am

Peter,

Here is a link to a 65 Thompson we restored a couple of years ago. It has some decent shots of transom in a 16'.

http://www.thompsondockside.com/views/v ... php?t=3390

I have restored a 20' Cruisers inc also that would have a very similar transom.

http://www.thompsondockside.com/views/v ... php?t=2840

I have an 85 model 115 Johnson w/T&T on regular transom and no problems, a friend has an off shore Thompson with a 90hp Honda and has no problem.

Good Luck
Image
Dan Stober
1965 20' Cruisers Inc. 570 Seacamper
1962 20' Cruisers Inc. 502
1963 16' Cruisers Inc. 202 Seafarer
Weatherford, Texas
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Postby PeterZ » Tue Jan 24, 2012 6:47 pm

Dan and Tim, thanks for your inputs. I ordered some Mahogany for the transom the other day. I am having a large panel glued up for the exterior, then I will laminate a piece of marine plywood to it for regidity, they the vertical interior planking. I was thinking of using 3/4 plywood and 1-1/8" thick Mahogany for the exterior and interior wood (the exterior will be 1-1/8" regardless of what I do, its being glued up now). Thats 3" thick.

does this sound like overkill to you guys?

Problem is, when I go to cut the shape, I am not sure a jig saw blade will be long enough to cut it. I have seen blades up to 4" in teeth, but the saw has a 'throw' that will take some of this as it 'jigs' : ). Also the transom edges are taperred a bit to meet the taper of the boat, ... I noticed from the orignial pieces. I am afraid the long blade will wander and not keep a nice taper. Perhaps I am worrying too much here and just need to 'get to it'!!

Tim, I will try to keep posted as I go. Guess I should keep a photo diary somepalce and share it. A photo is here:
http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/850/p1010859b.jpg/


Let me try to post another photo, failed that last couple of times.
Image

ewwww, ... it worked, here is another:
Image

I will post some of my transom experience, ... I hope its not a picture of a bon fire as I burn >$500 of a Mahogany mistake.

Dan, question from your pictures. In one shot of your 16'-ter, its upside down and your guys are all leaning on it, probably discussing why you didn't all go out and buy aluminum fishing boats :wink: , my keel area looks similar. Its hard to tell, but near the transom, there seems to be a line of unpainted wood, ... what covered that? Mine does the same thing, the wood keel seems to stop short of the transom on my offshore by about 30" then this strip of unpainted garboards about 3/4" or maybe a little less. What there a metal strip covering the whole keel area from bow to transom.

The guy before me started to remove stuff, and not sure if he removed something here.

Thanks to all
PeterZ
 
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Postby txcaptdan » Tue Jan 24, 2012 8:32 pm

There is a metal strip that runs from the end of the keel cap to the transom. It is that way on my 20' also. Supposedly the keel cap did not go to the back to avoid cavitation. I made a keel cap on an 18' seacamper that went all the way to the transom and could'nt tell the difference.
Image
Dan Stober
1965 20' Cruisers Inc. 570 Seacamper
1962 20' Cruisers Inc. 502
1963 16' Cruisers Inc. 202 Seafarer
Weatherford, Texas
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Postby LancerBoy » Wed Jan 25, 2012 5:02 am

Can you use a belt sander to shape the bevel on the new transom?

Yes, the keel should stop short of the transom by about 30 inches on your 1965 boat. There is an aluminum strip that covers the garboard gap that last 30 inches. Of course, caulk the heck under it before installation.

Andreas
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Postby Tim the Toolman » Thu Jan 26, 2012 8:08 am

Hi Peter, I've attached a picture of my keel at the transom. I have no history of my boat so I can't say if the configuration was original, probably not. There is a piece of brass half round from the bow all the way to the transom and it extends above the transom a few inches. Good luck with the transom, I'll need to replace mine too. Andrea's idea of a belt sander is a good idea for the taper.
Image
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Postby Tim the Toolman » Thu Jan 26, 2012 8:14 am

Let's see if this works:
Image
There, that's better. I tried Citristrip on the port side but I think my shop was too cold, didn't work very well. New 240V garage heater comning today, should warm things up better and I'm going to try Multi-Strip next. Tim
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Postby richnle » Thu Jan 26, 2012 10:18 am

I've used Citristrip a lot, and have found that if I apply it thickly, cover the area with plastic, and then leave overnight, it works better. If your paint or varnish is thick, it may take 2 applications. The overnight time helps, and the Citristrip will not dry out if you keep it covered with plastic (you can open up the bags the dry cleaners use over hanging clothes), even if you cannot get back to scraping for a full day or more.
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Postby PeterZ » Thu Jan 26, 2012 6:34 pm

Thanks all

Appreciate the advice and picture (Tim).

Might try the belt sander approach, ... but bad things happen with a slip of the hand, ... perhaps I am too picky, ... unlike rough framing (which I have done), this you have to treat more like your building a cabinet (which I have also done). Or take my dad's appraoch... 'nail it, its movin'.
:)

Regards
Peter
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