Ventilation required for varnishing

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Ventilation required for varnishing

Postby richnle » Thu Feb 16, 2012 6:08 am

I am getting ready to start varnishing all topside brightwork on the Grady White I am restoring. I've read in a couple of places that it is important to have adequate ventilation, even cross ventilation, for optimal varnishing conditions. It is also important to keep the varnish, substrate and ambient temperature above 50F. I am working in a single bay garage with an electric garage heater, which will not be able to overcome having the garage door open any significant amount. I'd prefer to not have to wait for warmer weather to start varnishing, but would appreciate your thoughts on how important providing ventilation is and how much ventilation I need to provide. Thanks!

Rich
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Postby LancerBoy » Thu Feb 16, 2012 12:55 pm

Don't worry about ventilation for the varnish and the boat. Worry about it for YOU a wee bit.

Actually, the less air movement you have the better. Any little air movement will encourage schmutz to fly thru the air and land on your fresh varnish.

Andreas
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Postby Torchie » Thu Feb 16, 2012 1:27 pm

Todays varnish's are much less" fumie" then ther old counterparts.
If you are concerned wear a good quality respirator. Biggest thing is wether or not you are able to maintain workspace temp for the required amount of time.
Plus Andreas makes a good point about fuzzies and air movement.
Back in the day when I used to work on Chris Crafts we went so far as to wet down the shop floor and spray our clothes with cling free to keep us from picking up static and dust.
Working in the winter always presents a challenge. I just finished bleaching my Off Shore windshield parts in the bathtub because it is to cold to work outside in the garage. Last week I rebuit the lower ends of both my outboards in the kitchen on the counter. Warmth and great lighting.
Good thing I have a loving wife 8)
Have fun and post some pictures.
Karl.
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Postby LancerBoy » Thu Feb 16, 2012 2:27 pm

I always wet down the floor before applying varnish.

Andreas
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Postby richnle » Thu Feb 16, 2012 9:37 pm

Thank you both for your replies and tips. I have a good respirator. Rebecca Wittman wrote in her book that good cross ventilation is necessary if you wish to see the varnish dry. It sounds like this is not too big of a concern.

Here is a photo of the hull. I need to bottom paint, flip her back and start reassembling and varnishing. So far all has gone smoothly including replacing the ribs and outer keel.
Image
Here is a photo of the new ribs
Image
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