fiberglassing seams

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fiberglassing seams

Postby TreelineIII » Thu Jun 28, 2012 6:34 am

I think we all deal with some small to medium sized leak that just tdrives you mad. Well I am thinking of doing something I had intended not to do. But a dry hull is key. I am thinking of running 2" or 3" fiberglassing the length of the overlapping seams underwater. Sorry the boat is a 1958 Cruiser inc 302 vacationer, 18 feet. There is minimal to no rot, and structure is ver sound. I had gone through an extensive rebuild about 5 years ago. From looking I can no tell for sure where the water is coming in other then wicking in through the lap seams. I would not be covering the entire bottom, which is helping me justify this direction. Any words of wisdom before I commit a sin!
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Postby LancerBoy » Thu Jun 28, 2012 2:27 pm

Nope, do NOT do it. You or the next owner down the road will curse the day it was done.

Andreas
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Postby Torchie » Thu Jun 28, 2012 10:44 pm

My vote is the same as Andreas.
I don't know about the construction methods for your type of boat but If the hull is in as good of shape as you say it is you might just have to reseal the keel.
Plus as Far as I am concerned the value of a wooden boat drops considerably once I have seen that it has been fiberglassed. But that may not be one of your considerations.
Karl.
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Postby Phill Blank » Fri Jun 29, 2012 9:26 am

TreelineIII,

I diffently agree with Andreas and Karl, keep the fiberglass away from a wood boat.
When you fiberglass and then leaks develope it is more then twice the work to fix the problem.

Wood boats do need attention just like a good woman. Keep her happy and do not glass her.

Good luck,

Phill
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Voice of reason

Postby TreelineIII » Mon Jul 02, 2012 5:48 am

And with voices of reason having been heard, the idea has ended. No fiberglass for this boat. I think it was a moment of weekness as I really did not want to do it either, but this leak is killing me. I think I might have to do what Andreas is saying. I always mess this up, but Andreas are you saying pull of the "outside Keel" and recaluk underneath?
Thanks
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Postby Phill Blank » Mon Jul 02, 2012 7:00 am

TreelineIII,

Yes, pull the outer keel and clean all old caulking and recaulk with a product like "Boat Life".
On the lapstrake hulls the keel to garboard area and the laps seams are some of the most common areas were leakage happens.

Good Luck,

Phill
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Postby txcaptdan » Tue Jul 03, 2012 8:10 am

I would consider tightening all screws and bolts on laps. Sand off and expose covered screws, pick out the old filler and tighten screws into ribs then tighten bolts ( someone working on the inside to hold nut) on laps, I did that several years ago to my 20' Seacamper and found most screws and especially bolts holding laps together needed one to two turns to come to snug. The boats have been bounced around the waves for over fifty years and the fasteners have worked their way loose.
You can reef out outer area where laps meet and fill with 5200 or boatlife to make final seal.
Do not fiberglass. I like to leave my boats so that someone in the future could restore and enjoy them
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1965 20' Cruisers Inc. 570 Seacamper
1962 20' Cruisers Inc. 502
1963 16' Cruisers Inc. 202 Seafarer
Weatherford, Texas
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